Find Reports and Papers

Please feel free to use Older Dominion Partnership's resources under the terms of this site, and contact us with feedback and suggestions, and/or submit a study.

For a complete listing of studies and reports click here, or search by the study's sponsor, the topic, and/or date of the study:


Source:
Topic:
Year:

Housing » Modifications for Housing

Why It's Important

Some older adults do not have the accessible home features they need to live safely and comfortably on their own. Demand for accessibility improvements is likely to increase in the future as older, very frail persons become a larger share of the senior population.


Various federal- and state-funded programs encourage the construction or rehabilitation of affordable housing - including accessibility improvements - and help low-income people pay their housing costs. These programs range from loans or grants to encourage affordable housing to funds for repair and replacement of inefficient heating and cooling systems.


How Richmond Is Doing

Content coming.

How Virginia Is Doing

Content coming.

How the U.S. Is Doing

The purpose of the paper is to provide guidance for future research on costs and benefits, and to illustrate the role of home modifications in efforts to reduce the cost of fall injuries.

  • Among older persons, the majority (55 percent) of fall injuries occurred inside the house. An additional 23 percent occurred outside, but near, the house, and 22 percent took place away from the home.
  • Approximately 43 percent of indoor and outdoor fall injuries among older persons occurred at floor or ground level (that is, not from a height). Fourteen percent of falls took place on stairs or steps, 11 percent from a curb or sidewalk, and nine percent from a chair, bed or other furniture. Around four percent involved the bathtub, shower or toilet. Locations for 26 percent of the falls were unspecified or "other."
  • Around 51 percent of older households containing at least one person with a physical limitation did not have any type of home modification at all; 23 percent reported one modification, 10 percent reported two modifications, and 12 percent reported three or more. The most common modifications reported were: extra handrails or grab bars (29 percent), wide doors/hallways (10 percent), accessibility features in the bathroom (10 percent), and ramps (9 percent).

(AARP PPI FALLS 2002)

 

According to a report from the Federal Interagency Forum on Aging Related Statistics entitled, Older Americans 2008: Key Indicators of Well-Being:

  • Housing with severe or moderate physical problems such as lacking complete plumbing or having multiple upkeep problems, has become less common.
  • In 2005, 5 percent of households with people age 65 and over had inadequate housing, compared with 8 percent in 1985.
  • 6 percent of U.S. households overall reported living in physically inadequate housing during 2005 compared with 8 percent in 1985.

(INTERAGENCY FORUM ON AGING RELATED STATISTICS, OLDER
AMERICANS 2008: KEY INDICATORS OF WELL BEING, 2008)

 

According to a recent survey taken by the National Association of Home Builders in a report entitled, Single Family Accessibility or Visitability:

  • The NAHB surveyed remodeling companies in 2007, 72% of the respondents reported modifying homes for aging-in-place needs, up from 60% in 2006. In additions, 75% of remodelers noted an increasing number of requests for aging-in-place features over the past five years.

(NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HOME BUILDERS,
SINGLE FAMILY ACCESSIBILITY OR VISITABILITY, 2007)

According to Hammel:

  • More than one-third of older adults reported feeling concerned about being forced into a nursing home as a result of barriers in their home. They also said they found it difficult to find and afford help to modify their homes to meet the needs.

(UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, THE IMPACT OF HOME MODIFICATION
SERVICES ON COMMUNITY LIVING AND PARTICIPATION
OUTCOMES FOR PEOPLE WHO ARE AGING WITH DISABILITES, 2005)

 

According to Houser:

  • 4.6 million ( 13 percent) of the older population had difficulty with at least one daily activity.

(AARP PUBLIC POLICY INSTITUTE,
NATIONAL HEALTH INTERVIEW SURVEY, 2005)

 

According to a recent report from AARP entitled, Increasing Home Access: Designing for Visitability:

  • Approximately 22 million persons ages 65 and older reported having physical difficulties in 2006. Of that number, about 14 million persons reported having difficulties walking a quarter of a mile and 11.5 million reported difficulty climbing ten steps without resting.

(AARP PUBLIC POLICY INSTITUTE, INCREASING HOME ACCESS:
DESIGNING FOR VISITABILITY, 2008)


Data & Information Sources

AARP Public Policy Institute Research Report, Falls Among Older Persons and the Role of the Home: An Analysis of Cost, Incidence, and Potential Savings from Home Modification, 2002

http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/il/ib56_falls.pdf

AARP Public Policy Institute, Increasing Home Access: Designing for Visitability, 2008
http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/il/2008_14_access.pdf

Federal Interagency Forum on Aging Related Statistics

http://www.agingstats.gov/agingstatsdotnet/main_site/default.aspx

Federal Interagency Forum on Aging Related Statistics, Older Americans 2008: Key Indicators of Well-Being, 2008
http://www.agingstats.gov/agingstatsdotnet/Main_Site/Data/2008_Documents/OA_2008.pdf

Hammel, J., L. Fogg, J. Sanford, D. Walens, J.G. Dahl, A.Gossett, K.Pietraszk, and K. Jopa, The Impact of Home Modification Services on Community Living and Participation Outcomes For People Who Are Ageing with Disabilities: Final Report. RRF Grant #2001-328. Chicago, Ill.: University of Illinois at Chicago, 2005
http://jrm.medicaljournals.se/files/pdf/40/4/914.pdf

Houser, A. 2007. Long-Term Care. Washington, D.C.: AARP Public Policy Institute.
http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/il/fs27r_ltc.pdf

National Association of Home Builders, Policy Single Family Accessibility or Visitability, 2007
http://www.nahb.org/generic.aspx?genericContentID=37885&print=true

The National Resource Center on Supportive Housing and Home Modifications, Guide on ADUs
www.homemods.org

U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey

http://www.census.gov/acs/www/